Conclusion

Conclusion

There are exceptions to every rule, but we hope that these solid tips for long-term investors and the common-sense principles we’ve discussed benefit you overall and provide some insight into how you should think about...
Be open-minded.

Be open-minded.

Many great companies are household names, but many good investments are not household names. Thousands of smaller companies have the potential to turn into the large blue chips of tomorrow. In fact, historically, small-caps have had greater returns than large-caps; over the decades from 1926-2001, small-cap stocks in the U.S. returned an average of 12.27% while the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index (S&P 500) returned 10.53%. This is not to suggest that you should devote your entire portfolio to small-cap stocks. Rather, understand that there are many great companies beyond those in the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA), and that by neglecting all these lesser-known companies, you could also be neglecting some of the biggest gains. (For more on investing in small caps, see Small Caps Boast Big...
Adopt a long-term perspective.

Adopt a long-term perspective.

Large short-term profits can often entice those who are new to the market. But adopting a long-term horizon and dismissing the “get in, get out and make a killing” mentality is a must for any investor. This doesn’t mean that it’s impossible to make money by actively trading in the short term. But, as we already mentioned, investing and trading are very different ways of making gains from the market. Trading involves very different risks that buy-and-hold investors don’t experience. As such, active trading requires certain specialized skills. Neither investing style is necessarily better than the other – both have their pros and cons. But active trading can be wrong for someone without the appropriate time, financial resources, education and desire. (For further reading, see Defining Active...
Focus on the future.

Focus on the future.

The tough part about investing is that we are trying to make informed decisions based on things that have yet to happen. It’s important to keep in mind that even though we use past data as an indication of things to come, it’s what happens in the future that matters most. A quote from Peter Lynch’s book “One Up on Wall Street” (1990) about his experience with Subaru demonstrates this: “If I’d bothered to ask myself, ‘How can this stock go any higher?’ I would have never bought Subaru after it already went up twentyfold. But I checked the fundamentals, realized that Subaru was still cheap, bought the stock, and made sevenfold after that.” The point is to base a decision on future potential rather than on what has already happened in the past. (For more insight, see The Value Investor’s...
Pick a strategy and stick with it.

Pick a strategy and stick with it.

Different people use different methods to pick stocks and fulfill investing goals. There are many ways to be successful and no one strategy is inherently better than any other. However, once you find your style, stick with it. An investor who flounders between different stock-picking strategies will probably experience the worst, rather than the best, of each. Constantly switching strategies effectively makes you a market timer, and this is definitely territory most investors should avoid. Take Warren Buffett’s actions during the dotcom boom of the late ’90s as an example. Buffett’s value-oriented strategy had worked for him for decades, and – despite criticism from the media – it prevented him from getting sucked into tech startups that had no earnings and eventually crashed. (Want to adopt the Oracle of Omaha’s investing style? See Think Like Warren...
Don’t chase a “hot tip”.

Don’t chase a “hot tip”.

Whether the tip comes from your brother, your cousin, your neighbor or even your broker, you shouldn’t accept it as law. When you make an investment, it’s important you know the reasons for doing so; do your own research and analysis of any company before you even consider investing your hard-earned money. Relying on a tidbit of information from someone else is not only an attempt at taking the easy way out, it’s also a type of gambling. Sure, with some luck, tips sometimes pan out. But they will never make you an informed investor, which is what you need to be to be successful in the long run. (Find what you should pay attention to – and what you should ignore in Listen To The Markets, Not Its...